Archives
Our Thought in One Place

  • Super Bowl XLIX Seattle Seahawks New England Patriots

    Are Super Bowl ads going digital? According to a recent article by Adweek, more and more companies are leveraging the power of online advertising to compensate for the increasing price of tv spots during the Super Bowl.

    Dan Greenberg, CEO of the ad exchange Sharethrough, noted that digital campaigns in the run-up to the Super Bowl can build buzz for a brand, as well as the spot it will air during the telecast. Out of the more than 50 advertisers that ran a Super Bowl-related campaign via Sharethrough last year, 75 percent also bought a TV spot. “It’s beyond promoting the video assets—it’s about promoting a much larger story,” Greenberg said.

    Businesses are becoming more aware that merely acquiring a tv spot for an ad will not mean success for their business. You have to have a product or service that works and a story that connects with your audience. A digital ad campaign gives your company an opportunity to tell a larger story on multiple mediums.

    What do you think? Is it enough for a business to have a Super Bowl ad in 2015? Or have our consumers become more digital? Tweet us your thoughts!

    image credit: Cronkite News

  • AdWeek is reporting that Nielsen showed an amazing 18.5 rating for ESPN during the 2015 College Football Championship game between Ohio State University and University of Oregon. To put that number into context, the previous most popular cable television program of all time was an episode of The Walking Dead on AMC at less than half that number.

    So you can bet that if you plan to run an ad during next year’s College Football Championship, you’ll be paying much more than this year’s fee of $1M per 30-second commercial. Were you one of those ~35M viewers on Monday night?

    ESPN college football

  • In today’s constantly changing world, social media can offer many great advantages to companies interested in communicating with their stakeholders. In the world of public relations social media communities and users can help push your companies message. Unfortunately, everything is not always pleasant on social media and can lead to small crisis communications situations for organizations.

    A few examples of social mishaps are below:

    • A KitchenAid team member accidentally tweeted a political tweet from the brands Twitter page rather than their personal page.
    • Brands used trending hashtags regarding the devastating Hurricane Sandy to promote their brands.
    • Brands also used hashtags that were highjacked. For example, McDonald’s hashtag #McDstories was highjacked by customers that were unhappy with McDonald’s and its quality of food.

    The best way to avoid social media mishaps is to create a social media plan. Often, without a plan social media is off the cuff and doesn’t often work. By creating a plan or strategy for your business the possibilities of incidents is limited. Creating a social media plan also helps you get results in your marketing efforts.

    JASE tips to creating a successful social media plan.
    • Create goals– Know what you would like to see out of your social media plan as it relates to marketing, engagement and sales. Know what is possible and set realistic goals so the plan is not doomed from the beginning.
    • Action steps– Take specific actions that will help you complete each goal. These actions can include the creation of a social media schedule or a list of planned content for different social media communities. each action should be specific to the goal.
    • Measure results– Determine what tools will help you measure your efforts. There are numerous free analytic tools that can measure your social media activity. Facebook has always some form of insights on each business page. By analyzing what you have done you will learn what works for your business and what needs to change.

    Social media planning does not have to be difficult. Often establishing goals is the easiest way to break the ice and helps you determine how you will accomplish each goal.

    Social media is even easier with assistance from the pros at JASE Group. At JASE a specific social media strategy is created to increase your businesses marketing capabilities. With JASE social media marketing is more than a few tweets. Learn more about a tailor-made social media marketing plan for your business by contacting JASE today.

    KitchenAidimage credit: by MrDays on Flickr

  • We all know the story of the Three Little Pigs. The wolf huffed and puffed and blew the little pig’s house down, but what if the wolf had been framed?  The Guardian, put a creative twist on the classic fairy tale in their commercial “Three Little Pigs”.  Produced by BBH, “Three Little Pigs” recently received recognition from Adweek as the Commercial of the Year.

    The commercial opens with the Big Bad Wolf boiling to death in a cauldron. The scene then switches to a SWAT team closing in on one of the three little pigs. The story  switches to various citizens of the U.K. as they try to decipher what went wrong. How could the wolf blow down the house if he had asthma? And if he didn’t blow it down, then who did? Towards the end of the commercial, after some investigative reporting The Guardian reveals the three little pigs blew the house down to collect insurance money to pay late mortgage payments.

    Check out the award winning “Three Little Pigs” commercial:

    In an age when newspaper publications are down, The Guardian infused a fresh and creative perspective on print media. 

    How is your company using commercial advertisement to increase customer engagement? As a creative advertising firm, JASE Group, LLC can assist your brand with developing results-driven advertising campaigns. 

    Guardian's Three Little Pigsimage credit: pshab on Flickr

  • Keep Norfolk BeautifulIn a story that Adweek ran recently, shoppers indicated that while green sentiments are important, those sentiments do not carry through to their wallets.

    What does this mean to green-product advertisers? Are we not doing a good job of conveying the benefits of green products? Or are the green products just not available to those looking for them?

    NEW YORK – Shoppers are thinking green, but not always buying that way, according to a new study released by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) and Deloitte.

    The study found that while 54 percent of shoppers indicated that environmental sustainability is a factor in their purchasing decisions, they actually bought green products on just 22 percent of their shopping trips. The survey is the basis of the GMA-Deloitte report released today titled “Finding the Green in Today’s Shoppers: Sustainability Trends and New Shopper Insights” and was based on interviews with over 6,400 shoppers.

    The study found that an interest in buying green extended across all age, income and education levels, with 95 percent of respondents open to considering sustainable products, and 67 percent of shoppers actively looking for them when buying. Yet only 47 percent actually found green products and just 22 percent actually purchased them.

    Get the full story from Adweek here.

    Environmental logo courtesy of our friends at Keep Norfolk Beautiful.

  • Keep Norfolk BeautifulIn a story that Adweek ran recently, shoppers indicated that while green sentiments are important, those sentiments do not carry through to their wallets.

    What does this mean to green-product advertisers? Are we not doing a good job of conveying the benefits of green products? Or are the green products just not available to those looking for them?

    NEW YORK – Shoppers are thinking green, but not always buying that way, according to a new study released by the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA) and Deloitte.

    The study found that while 54 percent of shoppers indicated that environmental sustainability is a factor in their purchasing decisions, they actually bought green products on just 22 percent of their shopping trips. The survey is the basis of the GMA-Deloitte report released today titled “Finding the Green in Today’s Shoppers: Sustainability Trends and New Shopper Insights” and was based on interviews with over 6,400 shoppers.

    The study found that an interest in buying green extended across all age, income and education levels, with 95 percent of respondents open to considering sustainable products, and 67 percent of shoppers actively looking for them when buying. Yet only 47 percent actually found green products and just 22 percent actually purchased them.

    Get the full story from Adweek here.

    Environmental logo courtesy of our friends at Keep Norfolk Beautiful.